No Good Deed Goes Unpunished



There’s nothing a disability insurance carrier likes better than a claimant who is “Mr. Nice Guy”. These are people who keep trying to do work even though they can no longer continue the occupation for which they have an “own occupation” policy and have a
clear cut claim for disability benefits.

What’s wrong with trying to keep working, one may be tempted to say? It’s the pioneer spirit. “Don’t give up the ship” and all that.

What’s wrong is that Mr. Nice Guy may scuttle his claim for benefits by trying to work at another job before making a claim under his policy. The carrier may have the right to say the claimant can perform duties similar to the ones he is performing at the time the claim is made, so he is not disabled as defined in the policy and, therefore, is not entitled to any benefits, let alone benefits for the occupation and income intended to be protected when the policy was purchased.
The problem is that “own occupation” is interpreted to mean the actual occupation at the time of claim – not the original occupation for which the insured originally purchased coverage.

So, if you modify your occupation to accommodate a disability, by giving up the duties you can no longer perform, then those duties are no longer considered part of your occupation when you subsequently file a disability claim.

Also, even if the carrier has to pay, the carrier may be required only to pay benefits based upon the salary or income of Mr. Nice Guy’s employment at the time of making the claim. These benefits would likely be much less than the benefits originally contemplated by the policyholder at the time of purchase. And the hefty premiums paid for the anticipated coverage would be gone with the wind.

So, if you have been astute enough to cover yourself and your family with an “own occupation” disability policy and you become disabled under its terms, don’t be a Mr. Nice Guy. To be safe, make your claim with your insurer under the terms of your “own occupation” policy when you become disabled under its terms and before you start doing any other work.

Certainly be Mr. Nice Guy to your family, your friends and even to people you may meet in the street. But, not to your disability insurance carrier.
 

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