The Cold Comfort Of Insurance

In the normal course of our lives, most of us learn to give people the benefit of the doubt, at least sometimes. Insurance companies never do. The reason – money.

Why this is so devastating to many people is that they learn this fact after they have been stricken with a disease or disability which seriously affects their lives. For all of their existence they have been told that insurance is meant to protect them and make them feel more comfortable should a disaster strike. Then disaster strikes and they learn the awful truth – the insurer won’t pay!

It really is simple arithmetic – every dollar the insurer keeps in unpaid claims is a dollar that goes to insurer profits. And, PROFIT, only PROFIT is the name of the of business today.
Owning an insurance policy used to give a policyholder some sense of comfort knowing that if the worst happened, an insurance company would be standing at their side and lending a hand according to the terms of their policy. Not so in today’s totally profit-centered world.

A perfect case in point is that of John Bray who had the gross misfortune to develop a brain tumor while employed as a division head for a travel company. As happens in many such cases, he didn’t consciously know there was anything wrong with him, but his conduct and behavior began to change on the job, leading to his ultimate dismissal.
Being unaware of his tumor, Mr. Bray tried to work as a consultant, but his behavior continued to deteriorate.

When he was finally diagnosed with a large malignant tumor in the brain, he had been dismissed from his employment for about 8 months. The overwhelming medical evidence was that he had suffered from the tumor which affected his behavior for a long period prior to the time he was dismissed.

Mr. Bray then filed for long term disability benefits under the group LTD policy which covered him as an employee f the travel company. But the insurer denied Mr. Bray’s claim, saying he was no longer covered by the policy once his employment terminated.

Did the insurer offer any medical evidence to refute the claimant’s medical findings? Of course, not. The insurer knew the truth of the matter so it didn’t even ask for a medical exam. Did that stop the insurance company from continuing to deny John Bray’s claim? Of course, not.

The insurer continued to insist that Mr. Bray had left his employment before becoming disabled, despite a clear showing by all examining experts in the field that he was stricken with his ultimately fatal illness before he left his covered employment and therefore was entitled to benefits.

The evidence was that John Bray was an outstanding employee prior to the time he was stricken with the brain tumor which enlarged relatively quickly. The tumor caused his employment behavior to change radically and, as a result, his employment was terminated.

Clinging to the fact that Mr. Bray’s brain tumor was not discovered for several months after he left his employment, the insurance company said he was no longer an employee and therefore not entitled to coverage. Not only that, Mr. Bray’s employer had also afforded him a life insurance policy as part of his employee package of benefits and the company refused to pay on the life policy because it claimed he had left his employment before he died.

The court, on the basis of the clear evidence before it, ordered the company to pay Bray’s estate the disability income benefits and the life insurance benefit.

Two things you can glean from the policyholder’s trials and tribulations in this case:

* If you become afflicted with a disabling disease which stays hidden until after you have terminated your employment, you probably face a long uphill fight with your insurer.
* If you should happen to be so unlucky, don’t give up. Fight for your rights.

“Wimping” out is not an option for you or your family.
 

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